IELTS Speaking Questions | How to Prepare IELTS Test Material

This is an article for IELTS students and learners. It consists of IELTS Speaking Questions with answers that are absolutely correct. So, IELTS Speaking Questions: How to Prepare IELTS Test Material is helpful content for the best material seekers. 

Questions 1-7

Complete the form below.

Write NOT MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND OR A NUMBER for every answer.

Hotel Columbus Guest information

First name:                                                1 ·······························

 Surname:                                                  2 ………………………….

 Street address:                                        45 3 … .. . . … . …………. …….

 Town/City:                                               Lewes

 State / County:                                        East Sussex

 Zip / Postcode:                                        4 ………………………….

 Country:                                                   United Kingdom

Email address:                                          5 …………………………. @yahoo.co.uk

 ID type:                                                     6 ………………………….

 ID number:                                               874236195

 Number of nights:                                   3

 Room                                                        7 ………………………….

Form completion

Task guide:

  • For this task, you have to complete a form with words and numbers that you hear on the recording, that are always a conversation/discussion between two people.
  • Read the instructions carefully, as they’ll tell you how many words you can make in use for every answer. In a task of form completion, the rubric always tells you the maximum number of words that you can use in every answer. Some of the answers will nearly always be numbers.
  • Look at the form cautiously and see how much you can predict. Think about who might complete a form like this, and what the discussion is generally going to be about. Keywords will help you to forecast the context. One of the speakers might be requesting information, arranging a meeting, or making a complaint, for instance.
  • You have to write words that you actually hear. Do not alter (change) the form of any words.
  • The questions that are given ask to follow the order in which you hear the information in the recording.
  • You have to write names of people or places that you have never heard before. They will usually be spelled for you. Longer names and numbers (phone numbers, for example) will be repeated.
  • You will only be predictable to know the spelling of very common first names and surnames, and very well-known place names. Less common or eminent ones will always be spelled out. These will not be spelled out. Smaller numbers will perhaps not be repeated.

Step-by-step guide:

Step 1 – Think first

Read through the form carefully. Is a word or a number needed for every gap?

What sort of word is required?

Do any gaps need a combination of words and numbers?

Do not forget that in the task here, you are drilled to write no more than two words and/or a number for each answer.

Make a decision if each of the seven gaps are needed:

A a word or two words

B a number

C One word or two words and a number

D a combination of letters and numbers

1 ……………… 2 ……………… 3 ……………… 4 ……………… 5 ……………… 6 ……………… 7 …………….. .

Step 2 – Check here that what you will hear.

Look at part of the conversation below. The answers for Questions 1 to 5 are in bold.

Audio script

So,

Receptionist: Well, let us begin with your name, of course. So, that is Martin … er …

Guest: Hartley. That is H-A-R-T-L-E-Y. Receptionist: Thanks . … And your address?

Guest: 45 Carlisle Way.

Receptionist: Could you spell Carlisle for me? Sorry.

Guest: It’s C-A-R-L-1-S-L-E. You don’t pronounce the S! Carlisle Way and that is in Lewes. L-E-W-E-S.

Receptionist: And is there a state? I don’t think, you have stated in the UK.

Guest: No, we have counties. It’s East Sussex. Sussex is with double S. The postcode is LW4 6AU. Do you want my phone number?

 Receptionist: Actually no … we make contact with people by email now.

Guest: Ah yes, and send me lots of advertising also, I assume. My email is hartleynitram@yahoo.co.uk.

Receptionist: Sorry … a bit slower, please.

Guest Says Mentioning Hartley, my surname … then Martin backward – n-i-t-r-a-m. That’s all one word.

 Receptionist: And all lower case?

Guest: That’s right. No capitals. At yahoo dot co dot UK.

Notice that the guest’s first name isn’t spelled out as it is a mutual name that you have to know about. It is, actually, stated earlier in the discussion also.

 The guest’s surname is spelled out because it is not mutual, and it would be biased to suppose you know how to spell it. It is also mentioned earlier in the discussion.

The street name in the address is spelled out, and repetitive because you would not be predictable to know it. The second part of the address of the street, though, is not. You will be probable to recognize words like Street, Road, Avenue, and Lane.

 The postcode contains six different letters and numbers. In this type of task, you have to listen cautiously to hear the right answer.

The email address is perhaps the hardest of the seven answers so you are given more help. It is repetitive and explained, and you are told that it is all one word, written in small.

Questions 8-10

Label the map below.

Write the correct letter A to H next to questions 8-10.

Where are the following places situated?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.